A Teachable Moment

PCT President Morty Rosenfeld periodically attempts to make sense of the increasingly senseless world of public education.

When Does Test Based School Reform Pay Off?

My readers are more than familiar with my view that there is almost nothing to be gained from high stakes testing, the results of these tests essentially serving to rank winners and losers. Millions of dollars have been spent, a nation’s teacher workforce has been demoralized, the public’s confidence in its schools has been damaged, the education of our children has been narrowed – all in the name of test based school reform. This morning’s news reports on the latest NAEP scores which show a slight decrease and which have put the reformers on the defensive. In following the discussion of the NAEP results, I came across this piece from the National Education Policy Center that is the best indictment of the test based reform agenda that I’ve read.

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The Shifting Political Winds

Those that doubt that the political winds are changing for the corporate education reform movement need only think about this weekend when President Obama acknowledged that we have gone overboard on high stakes testing and Andrew Cuomo, not to be outdone, announced that he recognized the evils of high stakes testing first and took steps to ameliorate it. Both men, each having consciously and aggressively used high stake testing to bludgeon public schools, now sense that there is a political reckoning coming as a nation-wide opt-out movement grows, the Common Core Standards are challenged by both left and right and parents increasingly recognize the negative stresses these reforms have placed on their children.

Neither Obama nor Cuomo has yet proposed fundamental changes. Less time devoted to testing is a small step in the right direction. Unless and until there is a recognition that annual standardized testing is at best an inaccurate measure of student accomplishment, unless and until the notion that these tests are a valid way to measure the effectiveness of teachers, unless and until there is an understanding that academic achievement is dependent on myriad variables most of which are beyond the control of public schools, the battle to reclaim public education from the corporate reformers who seek its demise will continue. While the statements of both men are welcomed, we await the real change we seek.

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Education vs. Training

Those of us who value education, especially public education, are faced with overcoming the very successful rhetoric of the reform movement that like an insidious virus has invaded our understanding of what it means to be educated, rapidly replicating itself to the point where many cannot remember or do not know that education was once about more than training for a job or college entrance.

My elementary schooling taught me to read, write and do some math, but it was about so much more. It was there that I learned about classical music, not a staple in my childhood home. I learned folk music too, songs of social protest, labor songs. So much of what we did in school was directed at citizenship, at our responsibilities to others. Excellent copies of great art works hung on the school walls, works that our teachers would talk to us about. There were weekly assemblies, often focused on guests who had come to talk to us. I vividly remember a family of refugees from the Korean War coming to speak to us about the plight of their country. I remember too the Korean folksong they taught. There was time for crafts of all kinds, from making a covered wagon out of strawberry boxes to woven bookmarks. There was time for fun. The best of the teachers I had told us stories of their own lives. Our music teacher even brought her French husband to school one day to talk to us about growing up in France and what France was like under the Nazi occupation. Or Miss Levy who had a travel itch and who told us wonderful stories of her experience of the midnight sun in Spitsbergen and spending a summer in India.

My teachers did so much to make us aware of the world beyond our Brooklyn community and helped us to understand our place in it. They had time to do these things. There were no pacing charts, no high stakes tests, no psycho-babble about twentieth skills, no making us anxious about gaining acceptance to college or our need to know what we wanted to work at as adults. We didn’t go home to hours of homework. The little homework that we had didn’t require the assistance of our parents. Home was for good time without parents, listening to the radio, watching television, reading and dinner conversations. My school was about getting educated. It was not about what I could take from the world but about what I might be able to give. It wasn’t aimed at preparing me for global economic competition but rather for citizenship and an enriched cultural life. Above all else it got me thinking about social justice and human freedom.

Some of my readers will respond that the world has changed. It surely has but in ways that make real education even more important than it was in my youth.

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The Latest Common Core Scam

One of the key points in the marketing of the Common Core State Standards has been the desirability of some to compare the accomplishments of students across state lines. How do New York students compare to those in Colorado or Utah? Universal standards for what children should be able to do grade by grade in theory make such comparisons possible. It is only theory, however, a theory that omits the reality that public education exists in a roiling political environment, one in which elected officials subordinate educational idealism to electoral realities. A front page story in the New York Times this morning makes this point exactly. It turns out that states define and report student accomplishment on the Common Core exams variously, making meaningful comparisons just about impossible. A student who is proficient in one state could be failing in another, even though both have been taught to the same standard. Every so slowly, the American people are learning that they have had their pockets picked once again.

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The Public Mostly Gets It

For 47 years Phi Delta Kappa and the Gallup Organization have been polling American attitudes towards public education. This year’s just released poll clearly shows that the American public does not support the major planks of the corporate school reform program. The public overwhelmingly believes that students are subjected to too many standardized tests and are against holding students, teachers and schools accountable on the basis of them, understanding that they are more than the score on a snap shot examination. Despite the massive publicity campaign to discredit our public schools and the tax dollars that support them, the number one education issue in the mind of the public is insufficient funding.

So if the public does not support the corporate reform agenda, and there is almost no evidence that it is working to improve anything, in whose interest are the test and punish reforms being pushed? Our democratic institutions are threatened as never before by the corruption of our politics by the moneyed interests. Central to that corruption is the attempt to discredit and privatize our public schools, the institution that sustains our democratic values. These interests throw massive amounts of money into our political campaigns, shaping the positions of candidates with their dollars. One of the key factors of Donald trump’s popularity is his unequivocal admission that he has given money to politicians of both parties because that’s what good businessmen like him do. After all, they need favors sometimes.

There is much to encourage defenders of public education in this poll. The reformers are clearly losing the battle for the public’s support. The remaining challenge is for public school defenders to build the political movement to defeat the corporate dominated stooges who represent us. For the unionists in this pro-public education coalition this will require a dramatic break from our traditional safety first politics. In this regard, the rush to early endorsements in the Democratic presidential primary is not very encouraging.

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The Seattle Strike

There were four education union strikes in the state of Washington this fall with the Seattle strike receiving the most attention. It remains to be seen whether this strike activity is a harbinger of increased union militancy or a phenomenon peculiar to special circumstances in the way schools in Washington State are funded.

One this is clear. The Seattle strike while about pay and benefits was also about professional conditions, the kind of conditions that have been demoralizing the people working in our nation’s public schools for some time. Already a leader in the anti-high stakes testing movement, the Seattle union representing teachers and support staff demanded and achieved two major concessions. Once and for all, they broke the ludicrous nexus between student test results and teacher evaluations, even winning some reduction in the number of tests required. Convinced that students were being subjected to more and more unrelenting academic pressures that were crowding out any time for students to relax and let off steam, the union bargained contractually mandated recess time for students. With some significant gains in special ed staffing and a financial package calling for a 9.5 percent wage increase over three years, an increase above a state funded increase of 4.8 percent over the next two years, the week-long strike certainly produced one of the best settlements we have seen in a long time.

The Seattle strike was clearly influenced by the recent teacher strike in Chicago, where a militant union mobilized the community to confront the test and punish policies of Democratic mayor Rahm Emmanuel. I want to believe that a trend is developing of a return to kind of militant education unionism that arose in the late 50’s and 60’s that ushered in an era of improving salaries, benefits and working conditions and which did so much to improve the lot of people working in our public schools and the children served in them. I want to believe that we can rebuild our movement from the bottom up and return it to a position where we sit at the table where education decisions are made as people who must be reckoned with because we are once again organized and organizing for ourselves and for economic justice in our nation.

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Big Surprise: There’s a Teacher Shortage

The top domestic story in this morning’s New York Times concerns the teacher shortage in many areas of the country. Imagine that! In is few short years, we have gone from a glut of teachers to a shortage. It’s not hard at all to understand how that has happened. Neither is it hard to figure out how to fix the problem.

The financial crisis hit states very hard, causing huge drops in revenue which in turn caused them to cut state aid to local school districts that solved their budget crises by laying off teachers. Across the country, thousands of teachers were excessed, many never to return to the profession, if they were lucky having found new careers. Those teachers who survived the layoffs found their wages frozen or stagnating and their working conditions deteriorating, both as a result of scarce financial resources and the acceleration of the corporate school reform movement’s drive to discredit public education with the goal of privatizing it. Key to discrediting the institution was a growing cult of accountability that has sought to tie student performance on standardized test to teacher evaluations, even though no reputable statisticians support the validity of this process. In many places, governors, often backed by the same forces pushing the so-called reform movement, launched attacks on education unions that ran the gamut from seeking an end to tenure to withdrawing or curtailing collective bargaining and pension rights. In short, that which made teaching attractive to many, job security, union wages, defined benefit pensions, the opportunity to do interesting, rewarding work and the certainty of a decent retirement began to evaporate.

With thousands laid off, with working teachers increasingly disgruntled, with much of the media reinforcing the lie that public education is failing America’s children, with teaching increasingly becoming test preparation, with all kinds of senseless barriers being created to qualify as a teacher being erected, is it any wonder that fewer young people are going into education. Why would a young person seek a career in which practitioners are increasingly presumed to be ineffective no matter what they do, where they are over scrutinized and under supervised, where they must hold multiple jobs to support their families and where their work is increasingly routinized? What is it that our society believes is going to attract them in sufficient numbers?

The attacks on teachers will either cease or the trend towards a growing shortage will continue. Young people seek careers that provide some dignity and status. Those are increasingly hard to come by working in public education today. Sadly, I find myself discouraging young people I meet from seeking to become teachers. I feel ethically obliged to do so.

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Andrew Cuomo Prepares to Blow Some Smoke

Governor Andrew Cuomo’s poll numbers continue to sink in large measure owing to the growing organized opposition to his education policies and the public perception that everything that comes from Albany is tainted by corruption. What does a desperate, cynical politician do when faced with extinction? If the politician is Andrew Cuomo he doesn’t think about changing his policies. He thinks instead of an emotional appeal to Jewish voters many of whom see a nuclear deal with Iran as inimical to the state of Israel. He leaks to the press that he is thinking of opposing any deal with Iran even before he knows what the deal contains and certainly before he has done any careful analysis of where the interests of the United States lie. He calculates that citizens will be dumb enough to forget the reason they have driven his poll numbers down in the first place – the content and style of his approach to governing.

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The Screen Invasion

Regular readers are well aware that I am at best suspicious of the importance of technology to the education of children, especially young ones. I see the infusion of technology in our public schools as a part of the corporate sponsored education reform movement that has cleverly but insidiously manipulated public opinion into almost a fetishistic belief that a modern education must be structured on a technological base. Without kids spending huge amounts of time staring at screens in school, all hope for rewarding employment in the future is jeopardized. Seemingly unaware that this belief gradually clouds the historic meaning of an education, its meaning coming closer and closer to training, ignorant and irresponsible school leaders seeking celebrity have become the unwitting handmaidens of the high tech moguls, using their power over public school budgets to purchase all of the paraphernalia a 21st century education is said to require. Once down this path, school districts are seemingly forever committing more and more of their budgets to trying to stay up-to-date technologically, not realizing that Silicon Valley has a business plan that renders this attempt impossible.

I’m thinking about all of this again this morning in response to my friend Jeanette Deutermann, the Long Island Opt-Out leader, drawing my attention to a piece in the Hechinger Report highlighting the mass introduction of I-Pads in the Mineola Schools. Deutermann was alarmed by what she read and wondered why more parents are not similarly aroused. The huge response by people to her Facebook posting of this article offers some hope that parents are beginning to recognize this invasion of screens into our classrooms as the serious threat to quality education that it is.

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Either They Are With Us Or …

If everybody who claims to oppose corporate sponsored school reform were willing to seriously do so, we would be much closer to what I still believe will be an inevitable victory. The vote of the Regents to adopt the Education department’s recommended APPR regulations was eleven in favor, six opposed. Among the eleven voting for adoption was Long Island’s Roger Tilles.

Tilles has enjoyed broad support from Long Islanders interested in public education. He correctly saw that the opt out movement had long political legs and almost embraced I by talking about its potency and correctly predicting its rapid growth. Joining the six regents who strongly opposed the new regulations would have built on his public support, and, beyond question, Tilles is smart enough to have known this. His support for the new regulations suggests that he has an agenda the importance of which trumps his allegiance to the anti-testing movement. Having heard him talk several times about his desire to become the next chancellor, I suspect that’s what his vote is about.

We can expect him to explain his vote as a strategic play towards a bigger goal than the changes to the APPR process. Others may choose to believe him I won’t. That’s a version of the excuse our legislators give for having voted to change the APPR law in the first place. Given his public record of opposition to much of what the new regulations contain, he was ethically obliged to oppose these stupid and harmful regulations.

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More Time to Do A Stupid Thing

The New York Regents having voted to grant four month delays for districts that show they cannot negotiate new teacher evaluation plans by the statutory November deadline is being viewed with deep relief in the public education community. It seems having more time to do something stupid if preferable to having to do it quickly. And stupid and wasteful of time money and energy the new system surely is. It’s the latest Albany perpetrated fraud. Complete with growth measures that can’t be substantiated to measure student growth, with independent evaluators who will know next to nothing about the context in which their evaluations of teachers will take place, with SLO targets, weighted averages, rubrics, matrices all adding up to HEDI scores – all to tell us what should be immediately discernible to a trained educator’s eye – whether a teacher is bad, good or exceptional. The more I think about this latest iteration of the teacher evaluation fraud the more dedicated I become to seeing to it that the scum-bucket legislators who voted for this crazy law pay the ultimate political price for they cynical bargain with governor who is owned by the corporate education reformers. If you doubt that take a look at this Common Cause report.

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Mystifying Teacher Evaluations

This morning, I read through the proposed Regents regulations to implement the new APPR process written into law during the state budget process. The language in which the proposed regulations are expressed is the usual opaque educationist drivel one has come to expect from an education department whose pronouncements are increasingly unintelligible. They have been developing an in- group slang language for educrats to be able to talk to each other without the outside world understanding what they are saying. One would think that the procedure for evaluating a teacher or principal could be expressed in clear, concise English immediately intelligible to the person being evaluated.

While I’m sure I will have more to say once the regulation are adopted, I can’t help observing once again that neither the current APPR process nor this new one will improve the education of the children of this state one jot. Neither is a significant improvement over the local evaluations systems in place before the education deformers decided to discredit them, encouraging the public to believe that teachers were essentially accountability to no one. That was and remains a lie. Forty years of working in schools convinces me that detecting really bad teachers, teachers who are subject matter deficient and/or who fundamentally lack the ability to teach and manage students is simple and amazingly easy. It’s so simple most students are capable to a very high degree of letting us know who they are. Locating the remainder of teachers on some sort of spectrum of ability is a far more difficult task and one that I grow increasingly sure causes more problems than it solves. It is hardly worth the time, money and effort devoted to it. It distracts us for the discussion of issues where we really could advance the work we do.

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Enough Evaluation Rhetoric

When do the politicians and educationists exhaust their capacity to pontificate on what kind of teacher evaluation and accountability scheme we should have? I’m so sick and tired high sounding verbiage that complicates what to me has always been really simple.

It has and always will be easy to spot teachers who do not belong in our schools. One shouldn’t need any teacher tests to know if a candidate for an English position is knowledgeable about the subject. A skilled English teacher armed with the candidate’s college and graduate school transcripts should be easily able to glean knowledge of the subject in the course of a good interview.

Of course one can know a subject thoroughly and not be able to teach it successfully. Those who are thoroughly lacking in teaching ability reveal themselves almost immediately to those who know how to look for teaching talent and care to see. One doesn’t need any rubrics to see if students are engaged in a coherent lesson on part of the established curriculum. One requires no arcane powers to gauge the quality of teacher questioning and the depth of the student discussion her questions provoke. Where a teacher has developed rapport and respect with her students, the presence of an observer causes the students to almost instinctively help that teacher shine – kids who feel supported academically and emotionally responding in kind. If one wants to view the efficacy of a teacher’s writing instruction, a periodic review of her written assignments is all that is necessary to see if quality work is being done.

I’m completely sure that what I’ve said for English works for any discipline. It presumes that the supervisor knows the subject herself and is confidently willing to honestly evaluate her subordinates. I stress the honesty piece in that over the years I’ve witnessed numbers administrators try to explain their failure to document the shortcomings of clearly bad teachers by blaming it on the strong union I lead. The fact is, however, our union has never gone to bat for a probationary teacher whose poor performance has been amply documented.

The really good news is that there never have been large numbers of ineffective teachers in my district. That’s true of most districts in our state. The overwhelming number of them work harder, invest more emotion and time in their work than they are paid for and are too often made to feel that their efforts are unappreciated. This seemingly endless search for the ideal way to evaluate them contributes mightily to their feelings of being underappreciated. Listening to them talk about the ever changing evaluation models, one senses that they perceive that they are being stalked by predators out to rob them of their profession.

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On Monday night our board of education voted to close our Kindergarten Center for the 2016-17 school year. That uniformed decision based on the recommendation of the superintendent of schools will have negative ramifications on many levels, one of which is that it will tend heighten the already existing over-focus on academics that has been degrading our kindergarten program for some time. Our district, like many, has to a very considerable degree allowed school reform propaganda and the Common Core mantra of “college and career ready” to shape a program that grows further and further away from what we know about child development. I strongly suspect that in the not too distant future we will be talking about early childhood schools for pre-K through K with curricula aligned with the natural curiosity of children to learn through structured play. When that discussion finally takes place, people will look back on the shortsightedness of the current plan and laugh sardonically about how the propagators of it were seen as visionaries.

The true visionaries are the school leaders who understand the need to base early childhood education on the science of child development. The have the foresight and nerve to buck today’s “best practice” for what real educators know about the needs of young children. This morning’s New York Times has an article that highlights some true visionary early childhood leaders who are returning kindergarten education to something much closer to Fredrich Froebel’s original approach of teaching children through play of increasing complexity. It’s remarkable to realize that back in the 19th century people knew more about how children learn than some people today who claim the title educator.

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The Ethical Challenges of Teaching Today

My understanding of the impact of poverty on children has been enormously enriched by the insights of Richard Rothstein, a scholar at the Economic Policy Institute. To read his work or to hear him speak is to see through the political smoke callous, ethically bankrupt politicians like Andrew Cuomo whose teacher accountability snake-oil is promoted to hide facing the failure of our society to deal with the reality that a quarter of our nation’s children live and are being permanently scarred by poverty. All of this is my personal preamble to Valerie Strauss’ publication of Rothstein’s remarks to the graduating class of Bank Street College of Education. While teachers have always faced ethical challenges, the totally corrupted state of our public schools raises ethical issues no previous generation of teachers has had to confront. Although I wish Rothstein had worked the possibilities of an ethical life in teacher achieved through collective action with one’s colleagues, his thought provoking remarks should be read and considered by every teacher in today’s public school classrooms, even in our best schools. This is a must read!

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A Clear and Simple Program for Our Schools

I’ve become a real fan of former Labor Secretary Robert Reich who has returned to academia and undertaken to use various media to explain complicated economic and social problems to general audiences. His film Inequality for All has in a very real way put the issue of the growing disparity between a tiny group of ultra-rich and the rest of our society at the heart of political debate in our country, with even the most conservative Republicans feeling obliged to address an issue which once would have belonged solely to the political left. From time to time he addresses education issues as in this Huffington Post piece accompanied by one of his short videos. His program for America’s public schools has been the agenda of my local union from the time I joined it over forty years ago. Sad to say, we are still a long way from achieving it. Take a look at what he has to say.

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Kids Need to See to Learn

Pam Gallin and some ophthalmologist colleagues went into some schools in New York City’s poorer neighborhoods and screened 2400 children for eye problems. Four hundred and fifty of them were found to need glasses, some of them so badly they couldn’t see the “E” at the very top of the eye chart. Some of the children who had been labeled behavior problems turned out to be simply trying to communicate with classmates because they couldn’t see what the teacher was doing. This is just one of the many difficulties poor children face. Many children miss numbers of day of school because of dental pain, their parents often not having the money for dental care or the ability to take off from work to take the children. Poverty reduces the quality of these children’s live in so many ways, ways that are not accounted for in much of the gibberish written about failing inner city schools.

Not only are these children the innocent victims of poverty, now the state of New York wants to victimize their teachers. Just imagine how many thousands of kids there are in the inner cities of our state who like the kids in Dr. Gallin’s op-ed need glasses but are unable to get them. Then remember that their scores on standardized test are used to determine the continued employment of their teachers. How stupid can our leaders be? Their vision is so much more difficult to correct.

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Always the Wrong Discussion

The subject of almost always seems to stimulate public discussion that is unrelated to the urgency given to it at any given moment. In other words, we always seem to be having the wrong discussion, or so it seems to me.

In my town, the burning issue is whether we should close our unique kindergarten school in favor of moving the students to our -1-4 buildings. Passions are boiling over this issue. Try to get a serious public discussion of the fact that the program we offer kindergarten children increasingly diverges from what we know from research on child development, and one is met with blank stares at best. Some weeks ago, I tried to say some of this at a public meeting of our board of education. I spoke about how an alarming number of the members I represent who work in the area of mental health report that they are seeing shockingly high numbers of children presenting serious mental health issues. After I was done speaking, one board member angrily took me to task for my remarks, as though I was the enemy of the people.

Our media are filled with almost vengeful criticism of our public schools, but how many people do we hear talking about a growing rejection of scientific findings by Americans as perhaps a symptom of a failing education system. Is it not a striking failure of our schools that so many Americans view the concerns of climate scientists that there is good reason to believe that human activity is adding significantly to the warming of our planet as a hoax? What’s wrong with schools that graduate millions of students who believe the earth was created 6000 years ago? So much of our public discourse springs ultimately from ignorance of almost cosmic proportions, ignorance that goes unaddressed by our society and its leaders who peddle ignorance for their own political advantage. We’ve reached a point where the Governor of Texas alerts his state National Guard to watch the maneuvers at a local army base, encouraging his citizens to believe that the federal government means to take Texas over. What kind of schools produce a citizenry that doesn’t laugh him out of the governor’s mansion?

Do we seriously think that Common Core is going to address this failure to equip several generations of Americans to participate knowledgably and intelligently in our democracy? How will these so-called standards increase voter participation from the 37 percent of the last election cycle? How are high stakes tests tied to teacher evaluations going to enable our children to free themselves from ignorance spawned beliefs that continue to plague mankind? What does the expression “college and career ready” mean if our public schools encourage more and more of our best and brightest to go into finance and hedge fund management? How are any of the so-called reforms that serve as the focus of our public discourse on education going to address our society’s sin for permitting generation after generation of America’s children to be raised in debilitating poverty, poverty that starts children falling behind their more fortunate peers literally from the moment of their birth?

So many serious questions about how we educate our children need serious discussion while we put our time, money and resources into what at best are marginal issues.

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Looking For Board of Ed Members

In looking to support candidates for the board of education elections coming up on the 19th of this month, more than ever we need to look for people with the courage to challenge the status quo, people who are willing to take some risks to defend our schools from the attacks from Washington and Albany.

We need to support people who understand the malignant effects of high stakes testing on students and teachers. Too many board members in my community talk a good game of being against testing but are willing in to do little beyond writing a letter and issuing a statement.

We need to find and support candidates who will hire and support school leaders who know how to lead, people who understand that loyalty has to flow down before it flows up. We need board members who understand that public institutions are not businesses and cannot be run on business principles that are focused on profits rather than the welfare of human beings.

Above all we need board members who believe the way public schools are currently organized to do their work is archaic, essentially an adversarial factory model that harkens back to a time when a docile, female workforce with few other employment options staffed our public schools. We need board members who know that there is untapped creativity and insight in the stifled voices of staff who are increasingly being ignored just when their thoughts are needed the most.

While my final though will appear controversial to many, to my mind it is the most important at this juncture. We need board members who understand that the quality of a school district is at best marginally related to the number of AP exams their high school students take. We need people who understand that the mission of public schools is the intellectual, moral and ethical growth of young people to the end that they become knowledgeable and engaged participants of our democratic society. We need policy makers for whom the phrase “college and career ready” expresses but a fraction of the very important work we do.

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Holding Our Leaders Accountable

I grow progressively concerned that too many in the public school community will simply sit back and accept what our elected leaders in Albany have done to teachers and public education. Last night I listened to a presentation by our superintendent to our board and the public as to what the new APPR law calls for, a presentation that presumed compliance with what she publicly stated was an absurd way to evaluate teachers. While our board president was happily enraged by what he heard and called upon the public to vote against our representatives who voted for it, there was not plan voiced to do anything about this betrayal. I also don’t hear from NYSUT, our state union, of a plan to get even with those who heretofore claimed to be our friends.

This morning I wrote to the leaders of our school community calling upon them to work with our union on the beginning of a plan for the accountability of Assemblyman Charles Lavine and Senators Kemp Hannon and Carl Marcellino, all of whom voted to double down on the tying of student scores to teacher evaluation. My email to school leaders follows. I encourage my readers in other schools districts to do the same.
POB Leaders,

After Dr. Lewis’ presentation on the New AAPR law, we all know that we have been betrayed by our elected leaders. It would almost be impossible to dream up a more stupid way of evaluating teachers than is provided for in this new law. Should this law be implemented, its impact on the teachers of our district will be profound. In my brief remarks last night, I doubt that I did justice to the deep anxiety and confusion I met when I attempted to address the concerns of the Parkway staff yesterday morning.

Assemblyman Lavine and Senators Hannon and Marcellino all voted for this law. I propose that the school community invite them to a community meeting to explain their vote to us. Invite is perhaps too weak a word. Maybe insist is better. While I doubt that any of those cowards will attend, if they don’t, we can then publicize their unwillingness to explain their votes.

Such a move by the leadership of the school community would accomplish three things. Firstly, it calls elected officials to account. Almost as importantly, however, it would suggest to the teachers who will bear the brunt of this law, that we are getting organized in their defense, that the entire school community understands the great unfairness that has been perpetrated against them. Finally, one way or another, the call for such a meeting will escalate the considerable pressure being exerted on our representatives to fix the problem they have created.

Let me know your thoughts.


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