A Teachable Moment

Former local teacher union pesident Morty Rosenfeld periodically attempts to make sense of the increasingly senseless world of public education.

Undue Influence of the Rich

Rich people automatically seem to assume that their economic success is evidence that they possess superior knowledge on all subjects. A significant portion of the public unfortunately seems to agree. It’s the modern iteration of Calvinist elect theology in which God’s grace is evidenced by human success. Perhaps one of the few good things to come from the Trump presidency will be a broad appreciation that rich people can be complete idiots.

I’m prompted to think about the undue influence of the rich in affairs about which they know nothing after reading about Bill Gates’ keynote address to the Council of Great City Schools. After spending billions on one ill-informed so-called education reform after another, after these reforms seriously demoralized a generation of public school educators, after supporting endless propaganda convincing many parents that their children’s schools are failing, after all this unnecessary chaos, here’s what Bill Gates learned. ““Giving schools and districts more flexibility is more likely to lead to solutions that fit the needs of local communities and are potentially replicable elsewhere… If there is one thing I have learned, it is that no matter how enthusiastic we might be about one approach or another, the decision to go from pilot to wide-scale usage is ultimately and always something that has to be decided by you and others the field.”

Schmuck! We could have told you that when your launched your first reform.

posted by Morty in Uncategorized and have No Comments

John King Strikes Again

Did anybody expect good things from John King, when on the verge of being run out of New York, the Obama administration selected him to replace Arne Duncan, himself a beleaguered education policy maker on the national level? So, it’s no surprise that Kings draft of the regulations implementing the recently passed Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) proposes that 95 percent of students in a public school district must participate in the state’s high stakes tests or the district may suffer a penalty in the form of a cut in Title I funding.

That these regulations violate the spirit of not the letter of the recent legislation is clear. The whole focus of the bi-partisan ESSA was to return authority to the states to determine issues of standards and testing. But that doesn’t seem to matter to John King. A tool of the corporate education reform movement, King looks at the country and sees a growing national opt out movement threatening that movement. He remembers the power and fury of the opt-out movement in New York and how it made his position there untenable. He appears determined to use his brief time in Washington to try to use the economic power of the federal government stifle the voices of parents and educators who with increasing militancy are demanding an end to corporate reform movement’s rape of our nation’s public schools.

Our national union leaders ought to be questioning Hillary very carefully about her thoughts on this move by King to defeat the opt-out movement. Here in New York we have a right to know what our would-be majority leader Chuck Schumer thinks about this issue. Wouldn’t it be hopeful if he had one of his almost daily media events to demand end to this threat to a parent’s right to determine whether her child will participate in the state’s regime of high stakes tests?

posted by Morty in Uncategorized and have No Comments

You Thought You Knew About Pearson

Mention the name Pearson in the circles in which I travel, and it is as though you mentioned some sinister, criminal enterprise. No other company is so closely associated with high stakes testing and the corporate influence on public education. Yet, I suspect that most of the people I know in public education, like I, know very little of just how pervasive the influence of this company is on education – from K to graduate school. One needs to read Stephanie Simon’s piece on Politico to begin to understand the frightening extent to which Pearson saw the potential in the American school reform movement for them to make huge profits, cultivating a perception gullible by school administrators that only they had the materials, test and programs to bring the academic progress the reformers demanded. I certainly never understood that they have been repeatedly given huge, no-bid contract by major public universities to provide those schools with online college courses. If you have been angered at the business influence on our public schools, read this piece. It will enrage you. I hope some of the nation’s attorneys general read this piece and start to look into these no-bid contracts Pearson has gotten. There almost has to be something seriously wrong here.

posted by Morty in Uncategorized and have No Comments

Faith in Our Schools

Perhaps the most corrosive effect of the corporate school reform movement has been its frightening success at discrediting the institution of public education, often even in our nation’s best school districts. In Plainview-Old Bethpage, an upper middleclass community with schools that much of the nation would envy, I meet more and more citizens who are increasingly mistrustful that our schools have the best interests of their children in mind. Their mistrust includes the school administration and the teachers. On one hand they appear to believe the false reformer rhetoric that has their children locked in a dire economic competition with the rest of the world whose educationally advanced students are preparing to sink our children into penury, while on the other, they are coming to realize that we are driving our children to undertake a volume of academic work that leaves them little to no time or space required for their psycho-social development.

At our board of ed meeting last night, the issue was how to deal with Common Core Algebra 2, a revamped state course of study that appears to omit certain trigonometric functions necessary for the study of advanced mathematics and physics and which are tested on the ACT college entrance examination. A group of citizens came to petition the board to exercise its option under New York regulation to switch gears and return to the old curriculum that covered the trig topics in question, something which a number of districts in our area are doing in the name of giving their students a competitive advantage. Speaker after speaker spoke to how the current curriculum and the Regents examination it is geared to disadvantage their children who will compete with students from the districts who will be doing the easier and trig inclusive curriculum and exam. Seeking to assuage these patents’ concerns, the superintendent suggested that the district offer after-school and weekend classes on the missing trigonometry topics while changing the pre-calculus course next year to include trig. That proposal was met with an intense anger, with parents voicing how their children could not possibly fit one more thing into their already precisely scheduled, over stressed lives. With the board vote against the motion, the parents left talking about the injury the school district has inflicted on their children, their respect for and belief in the institution diminished – diminished ultimately by a school reform effort that our local leaders feel powerless to change.

posted by Morty in Uncategorized and have No Comments